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Introverts

Introverts, Extroverts and Shyness – The Real Differences

April 15, 2017

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Differences between introverts and extroverts

If you want to evolve fast, it is vital that you know the differences between introverted and extroverted people, their strong points and their weak points, and why your own personality type matters that much. Well, it is all related to how you can manage your social energy and the two different ways introverts and extroverts use to recharge and use this energy.

I’ll use a metaphor to make you better understand what this social energy is, and how you can use it to your advantage.

Imagine a battery within yourself – your own social energy battery. To have healthy relations with others, you’ll have to learn how you can manage that limited battery’s energy. You are the only one responsible for keeping your battery charged, and every person has its own ways of both recharging their battery and using its energy.

The main difference between introverts and extroverts is in the way they manage their social energy. What makes it different for the two is that introverts and extroverts can’t recharge their batteries in the same way. This is the only truly important difference between the two personality types, and should be the only way to differentiate between them. It is also why shyness hasn’t got much to do with you having any of the two personality types.

Who is the introvert?

The introvert is a person that recharges their social batteries from doing solo activities: watching a movie, reading a book, watching TV, meditation, etc. An introvert also uses up a lot of this energy when he’s in a social environment, especially when he is surrounded by strangers or meets new people. This is due to how introverts feel a more intense need to wear a social mask. When he is surrounded by people who know him well, he doesn’t need that much energy because he doesn’t need his social mask as badly. However, when surrounded by strangers, it is the opposite.

An introvert’s strong point is his ability to deeply connect with one person at a time. In the same way that it is easier for the extrovert to manage his interactions with a (bigger) group of people, the introvert excels when it comes to connecting with one person at a time. Also, studies show that most of the world’s great inventors, engineers and scientists are introverts.

Who is the extrovert?

As opposed to introverts, they recharge their batteries from participating in group activities and from being surrounded by people. Things like going to a party, attending social events, volunteering and working with others are the type of activities that make extroverts recharge their social energy very fast. They don’t feel the need to wear a social mask as much as introverts do, so they’re more comfortable being natural. An extrovert uses a lot of energy when he has to do solo activities like working alone, and anything that might imply staying indoors by himself. He is not as good at listening to his own thoughts as the introvert is, which is why he spends so much energy when he has to do it.

An extrovert’s strong point is his ability to interact with groups of people, to be liked and wanted around by groups and to be popular, in general, without much effort. It is harder for an extrovert to connect very deeply with one person, and his social skill is still at its best when in a group.

Introverts and shyness

Most shy people think of themselves as being introverted, and very often confuse the two terms. Truth is, extroverted people can be (and are) shy too. While it is true that extroverts are a bit less likely to be shy due to how their comfort zone is usually expanded more into the social side, it doesn’t mean that introverts can’t train great social skills too. Actually, in order to feel happy and successful, they must do so.

We, as humans, are social animals, and there’s a strong reason to this metaphor. We can’t feel happy without our social relations. I’m confident there’s no person in this world that prefers being alone (doesn’t keep contact with his family, doesn’t have close friends and a partner), that can also honestly say they are happy. I see people who claim they are happy this way (on the internet, of course), but any sociable person can tell they lie to themselves. They only hang on to the ambition to “not waste time with social relations” because it’s the only thing they can use as an excuse for their lack of motivation to do something with their life.

We can’t be happy, productive and have results in any domain of our life if we can’t do well socially!

You need to have a fulfilling social life in order to be happy and successful!

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Source by Andrew D. M.

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